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Our Servises

Crickets

crickets are brown, black in color 1″-1 and half inch in length and are common in summer and fall. They are nocturnal, live outdoors, but will enter homes seeking moisture.

Ants

We have a number of different species of ants in the Arizona desert, most measure between 1/8 and 1/16 of an inch long. Most ants are brown/black in color, have multiple queens in their nests, feed on sweets, and begin their population explosion in the springtime.

Scorpions

Scorpions come in a variety of colors, are up to 2inches in length, are primarily nocturnal, and are attracted to moisture. They will feed on other insects, following them into homes. If stung, seek medical attention.

Earwigs (Pincher Bugs)

Earwigs eat plants and dying insect material. They are nocturnal and will be found hiding in moist shady areas throughout the daytime. Because of their habits and feeding requirements, earwigs are primarily garden pests. They will be quite well controlled through a regular exterior pest treatment.

Roaches

Here in Arizona, we deal with two main types of roaches. The American (sewer roach) is the biggest at almost 2″ in length. Also known as the palmetto, they are reddish brown in color and enter homes through small cracks, and are found under wood, leaves and around pools looking for moisture. The second roach we commonly see is the German cockroach. This is the one normally found in a restaurant infestation. They are much smaller, about ½ of an inch can cause infection and disease and will feed on almost anything. They are prolific breeders, and will live in voids and cracks in walls.

Ticks

Ticks are ¼ inch in length and are reddish brown in color. The American Tick is commonly confined to the outdoors however they generally make their way inside on pets or rodents. Keep pets from venturing into thick overgrown vegetation where ticks may be present. Have pets checked and treated regularly. If you find you have an infestation contact a pest control professional ticks can carry several dangerous diseases.

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